I never had bipolar disorder at all.

I discontinued all psychiatric treatment after my ECT. I did that thing you’re never supposed to do and lied to my doctors. I stopped seeing them. I felt just fine for years. In 2009, my symptoms flared up again. I went to Johns Hopkins with no medical records and presented all of my symptoms, without mentioning my previous psychiatric history.

I was given a full neurological workup, and after six months and several MRIs I was diagnosed with relapse-remitting multiple sclerosis, a disease that easily encompasses all my symptoms.

I disclosed my psychiatric history to my neurologist and my new GP after I received my MS diagnosis. They were both sad, apologetic for their profession, and both told me this isn’t that uncommon.

Let me say that again, please: They both told me this isn’t that uncommon.

It Happened to Me: I Had Electroshock Therapy

for my growing collection of articles about women who were misdiagnosed

(via heatherpattern)

montytown:

Deal with it.

BOK BOK BOK

(via pearlsnapbutton)

switchum:

Motorcycle repair girl in Bangladesh

“Khadija wields her wrench like a contestant on Star Academy might clutch a microphone,” writes the magazine Philanthopy Age. “It’s both an invaluable tool, and a symbol of her aspiration.”

Khadija’s story

thefilthofhealth:

historicaltimes:

"Disability activists abandon their wheelchairs and mobility devices and crawl up the 83 stone steps of the U.S. Capital Building demanding the passage of the American with Disability Act, March 12, 1990."

fuck yes

thefilthofhealth:

historicaltimes:

"Disability activists abandon their wheelchairs and mobility devices and crawl up the 83 stone steps of the U.S. Capital Building demanding the passage of the American with Disability Act, March 12, 1990."

fuck yes

(via jennyandthelibrarians)

conquer-gravity:

Flynn’s definitely a punk so I made him a stylish vest with scrap denim

(via snack-tray)

I find things like that last ask really disturbing. It's the same for every "minority" [and I put that in quotes because some minorities are actually majority, they just don't have control over politics/academia/military to make their voice heard]. I hate the "prove it" attitude that comes along with this crap. It happens to all non white races [especially black], women and people of other sexualities besides straight. No one EVER questions if a white male did something, they simply accept it,
polianarchy polianarchy Said:

medievalpoc:

hmasfatty:

medievalpoc:

but if someone says a black person invented or discovered ___. Everyone says “but are you 100% SURE?” These days even if women like something particularly “gendered” to be for men [i.e. geek/tech culture] they say “are you a REAL fan?” and play 50 questions or mansplain assuming you don’t know anything they’re telling you. And if evidence comes out saying an individual was gay/bi/etc. even if its one line in a book everyone says “but what proof is there REALLY they arent alive today you assume”

^ Two views on this matter from readers.

Here is the information for this piece on ArtStor:

I am not an Ancient Art Historian.

This is the information I have for this piece.

Here’s a bit more history on Greek Terracotta figurines of Black people, with possible interpretations and context for them. The actual piece explored/pictured is a different one, but the overall grouping of these kind of statuettes is also discussed by Sheldon Creek, the author of the series.

Here is a Wikipedia page for Reynold Aleyne Higgins, the cataloger of Terracotta figures for the British Museum, with bibliography.

Once again, I am really not sure what exactly I’m being asked, here. I’m stepping out of the discussion, because it sounds like a lot of people want me to bust out some calipers and start measuring noses.

I do not do that here. I have documented the history in the Americas and in Europe of various “scientists” doing just that, and it’s still going on, as I have just posted.

I have my own views on this matter, and I plan to ruminate on them.

What I do not plan to do is tell any of my readers what to think; I do expect you to think on WHY you have these questions, and why you believe they are necessary.

For some reason, this business reminds me a lot of the whole “but why do the people in anime look white/insufficiently Japanese?” conversation/ridiculousness

That’s because it’s essentially the same conversation, but with anti-Blackness.

Here’s a link to yet another roundup on Kotaku of people willing to go to extremes to “prove” whether or not anime characters are supposed to be Japanese or “white”. Click the link with caution-how many literal charts measuring people’s facial features to determine their race can YOU handle?

There is an incredibly pervasive and insidious conviction in American society and culture that all people of the same “race” look the same.

That is what every conversation like this boils down to.

I am desperately trying to redirect attention towards that, and away from MEASURING PEOPLE’S FACIAL FEATURES AGAINST A STEREOTYPE.

I am saying this as someone who IS in fact affected by this kind of thinking, as someone who had a white “friend” hold a can of Calumet Baking Powder up to my face in a grocery store and say, “Oh, it looks just like you”.

This is a can of Calumet Baking Powder:

image

My patience for this is wearing thin now.

WE NEED TO THINK ABOUT WHY WE SEE WHAT WE SEE WHEN WE LOOK AT ARTWORK FROM THE PAST. WE NEED TO THINK ABOUT THE OBJECTS AND ARTWORKS THAT SURROUND US RIGHT NOW AND HOW THEY AFFECT WHAT WE SEE.

WE NEED TO THINK ABOUT STEREOTYPICAL IMAGES AND HOW WE ARE AFFECTED BY THEM EVERY DAY.

Sleeping Black Man does not resemble a work like this one:

image

Or this one:

image

How much of what we consider racial features or a racially “marked” work of art relies on stereotypes we recognize because they are still hypervisible in the media today? How much do you think what white people think Black people look like has mattered in the determination and cataloging of these works of art?

Why do you think we are relying on modern stereotypes regarding what Black people look like, in order to determine the “race” of works of Ancient Art?

Sleeping Black Man is NOT painted with black paint, and has had his facial features weathered by time:

image

So has Memnon:

image

So has this head of a woman with coiffure:

image

They aren’t painted. Their features are worn. They are more realistic than Sleeping Black Man; they are portraits of individuals, most likely.

NONE OF US ARE OBJECTIVE IN THIS.

What people seem to be asking me is for some kind of totally impartial, objective way of determining, HOW to decide, if Sleeping Black Man is “really” Black. WHERE do you think that information comes from? Why are you looking for someone to just TELL you already?

Stop asking for some kind of authoritative answer to come down to you from the imagined realm of Totally Objective People Who Decide What Race Everyone Is. Look in the mirror and ask yourself WHY you see what you see.

bronyphobe666:

pholotinshep:

cerpaldi:

This is an amazing site for calming down after a panic attack or to get your mind off of anxieties, basically you just make sand art with your mouse. Highly recommend

THIS IS SO COOL THO

SO MUCH FUNNNN

image

image

aaahh this is actually really soothing!!

(via heatherpattern)